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fortune

An app that customizes fortune cookies and delivers them to the future you

 
 

How Might We

Stop repeating same mistakes?

 

Humans make the same mistakes over and over. We all know time is the best medicine for every pain of life, but when not feeling pain, people will be more likely to make the same mistakes; it is the neglect of this feeling that causes us repetitively behaving in same patterns, potentially bringing about lifelong regrets. To resolve this problem, let's start with why do people behave like this.

 

Research

There are research teaching us how to avoid repeating the old same mistakes all over again, but there's no tool that can actually help us achieve the goal.

To design the tool to solve this problem, let's start learning how exactly does our brain works that lead to this repeatable pattern?

From the public experience, we already know how people react to regret, and narrow down the target user group (age between 16-60).

Now, let’s start learning why smart people make the same mistakes over and over? Or why you see so many stressed-out people acting like toddlers?

This research shows that the answer is in ourselves. The current pop culture almost demands superficial feelings and self-defeating behavior by duping us into living and loving in the wrong part of the brain.

There are two parts of our brain that affect this behavior: Adult brain and Toddler brain. Adult brain refers to our prefrontal cortex, and Toddler brain refers to our limbic system. When we're not under stress, we’re able to turn pain and failure into growth and accomplishment in the Adult brain, which is the most profoundly evolved part of the most complex organism in the known universe.

Unfortunately, the assess and improve modes of our prefrontal cortex can often be hijacked by habits forged in the Toddler brain when those habits are repeatedly reinforced in adulthood. When we are under stress, our brain will retreat to the Toddler brain, we create conflict and almost invariably act out self-defeating behavior.

Advances in technology also create information overload and overstimulation, causing more frequent retreat to the Toddler brain, where we have no foresight or ability to think through the consequences of behavior.

 

narrowing in on a problem

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user journey

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deconstruct the job

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Persona

To understand who I was designing for, I conducted 9 initial phone interviews with students and new professionals. I found patterns in users perceptions and tasks and aggregated my findings in the form of a persona.

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Context

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WIREFRAME

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app

 

Landing Page

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Home Page

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Start

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when having regrets: customize the notes

 
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Step1: Clarify your regret

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Step2: Write a note to yourself

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Step3: Choose a category for the regret

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Step4: Pick a cookie flavor for this category

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Demonstration

 

Overview

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sound activation

What if the mistake I make is too painful and too distracted for me to open this app? Don't worry; it can be activated by hearing "Oh, shit!"

 

still feeling painful? Get some instant suggestions

 
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It is crucial for users to have instant feedback after they enter their regrets.

The cookie is served as a future reminder, but peer networking interaction can be served as a console to help users feel better right after they type in regrets.

 

feeling better?: let's review the activity log

 
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real cookies: the best advisor for yourself

 
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AR note

Finally, if people really want an old-fashioned fortune note, there is a hidden AR message hidden in the package of your cookie.

 

theory of change

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