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Actually, not that bad

A public experience that helps alleviate pains from regret

 
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How Might We

Make people feel better when regret happens?

 

Research shows that you should ask yourself this question:

Ask yourself, “How could it have been worse?”

This is what researchers call a “downward counterfactual thinking.”

Another research also shows that downward counterfactual thinking benefits us by improving our mood, further to killing the pain after we’ve learned lessons from something we did wrong.

This thinking kills the negative feelings associated with regret. Turn disappointment into gratitude.

Take “I can’t believe I crashed my car. I’m so stupid.” and turn it into “I’m so lucky I didn’t die in the accident. How wonderful!”

(Resources are linked above)

 
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However, it's so abrupt to ask someone who is having a bad mood "Could it be worse?"

HMW deliver this thinking methodology to people without being offensive?

 
 

To address this problem,

I changed the way to approach people; I designed a public experience.

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Creative approach: Progressive prompts

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Experience video

 
 
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Insights

1. Some people don't even know their regret

2. Some people don't even have regret

3. The older the people are, the less chance the people have regret.

4. Some people don't want their regret to be revealed.

5. Age between 16-60 has a higher chance to have regret.